Why Blood Work Can’t Evaluate Homemade Dog Food

Following on from his previous 2 articles, Dr. Ken Tudor follows up with how blood tests cannot give you the full story of if your dog’s homemade diet is adequate for its health needs.

Dog Food Matters

The last two posts have highlighted my worry of a potential surge in medical problems in dogs caused by improperly formulated homemade dog food. My concern in writing the articles was that the various strategies of those feeding homemade were based on assumptions that would necessarily lead to unbalanced diets. Moreover, 95% of all homemade dog food recipes found online and in popular books have been shown to be nutritionally inadequate. Thoughtful comments from a reader highlighted why routine veterinary monitoring, especially blood tests, will not detect most dietary insufficiencies.

 Blood Test Can't Detect Nutrition Deficiencies

What Are the Essential Nutrients for Dogs?

Daily dogs need adequate quantities of:

  • Total Protein and Specific Amino Acids (from protein) – arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine. methionine, phenylalanine, taurine, threonine, tryptophan, valine
  • Total Fat and Specific Fatty Acids – linoleic acid, alpha linolenic acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenic acid (EPA)
  • Vitamins – A, D, E, K, B

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